Category: Bug Bounty (Page 1 of 3)

Bug Bounty: Take the leap – [ITW] Alain Tiemblo @BlaBlaCar

Alain Tiemblo – BlaBlaCar Web Security Lead Engineer

Since September 2017, BlaBlaCar has been managing with a select number of security experts a private Bug Bounty program to enhance the operational security of its platform.

Previously accessible only by invitation via BountyFactory.io, YesWeHack’s bug bounty platform, this program has enabled BlaBlaCar to remain proactive on the cyber security of its services.

Thursday April 19, BlaBlaCar’s program is public

What is your role at BlaBlaCar?

I am a backend developer profile, today overseeing application security. When I was joined BlaBlaCar, I was in charge of the platform’s performance and security. In mid-2015 and early 2016, our operational security needed to level up significantly, especially following our major fund-raising campaigns, which put BlaBlaCar under the light, pressure. So at that period of time, i took the lead of a small team to mitigate these attacks, and audit/consolidate the platform.

What is your approach to security, including coordinated vulnerability disclosure?

We have kept application security in-house for a long time. Previously, we used classical audits conducted by various companies, by several basic pentest applications, by using static analysis tools, etc. I think it helped to rough out a lot of little things that would have been detected by bug hunters.

In addition, we received a few troll messages on Twitter reporting vulnerabilities without notice and without any details… We also have some emails via customer support about potential security holes, but nothing was disclosed by these contacts, they first wanted to be paid and this, without proof of the existence of a security flaw, so it was impossible for us to enter the game.

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Bug Bounty : Franchir le pas – ITW d’Alain Tiemblo @ BlaBlaCar

Alain Tiemblo - Bug Bounty - Vulnerability Coordination

Depuis septembre 2017, BlaBlaCar propose à un nombre d’experts en sécurité triés sur le volet, un
programme de Bug Bounty privé afin de renforcer la sécurité opérationnelle de sa plateforme. Accessible
jusqu’alors uniquement sur invitation via BountyFactory.io, la plateforme de bug bounty de YesWeHack, ce programme a permis à BlaBlaCar de rester proactif sur la cybersécurité de ses services.

Entretien avec Alain Tiemblo Web Security Lead Engineer – @BlaBlaCar – manager du programme de Bug Bounty.

Jeudi 19 avril le programme de BlaBlaCar est public

Quel est votre rôle au sein de BlaBlaCar ?

Je suis un profil développeur backend, aujourd’hui chapeautant la sécurité applicative. Lorsque je suis arrivé à BlaBlaCar, je m’occupais de la performance et la sécurité de la plateforme. Mi 2015 début 2016, nos besoins en sécurité opérationnelle ont augmenté de manière significative notamment à la suite de nos grosses levées de fonds qui ont suscité quelques convoitises. J’ai alors pris le lead d’une petite équipe afin de mitiger ces attaques, et auditer / consolider la plateforme.

Quelle est votre démarche en termes de sécurité et notamment de divulgation coordonnée de vulnérabilités?

Nous avons pendant longtemps gardé la sécurité applicative en interne. Auparavant, nous faisions appel à des audits classiques menés par diverses entreprises, par plusieurs applications de pentest, en utilisant des outils d’analyses statiques, etc. Je pense que ça a permis de dégrossir beaucoup de petites choses qui auraient été détectées par des chasseurs de failles.

Par ailleurs, on a reçu quelques messages de trolls sur Twitter signalant des failles sans préavis et sans aucun détails…

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SaXX, number one of Bounty Factory’s all time ranking.

This month, we publish an interview with one of the best researchers of our  Bounty Factory called SaXX who is only 27 years old.

In the all time ranking, SaXX culminates in the first place and he intends to defend his ranking well. Like Rafael Nadal, SaXX never gives up and works hard to exercise his passion with his true mischievous side!

1. Where did you get your nickname?

Well, that’s a question a lot of people ask.
I only tell the genesis of this nickname in certain circles.

2. What’s your background?

I have a career path that some would describe as classic. I had a BAC S (maths specialization) then a BTS IG at that period of time. After the BTS, I didn’t really know what to do so I let myself be tempted by an Information Systems Management school in Lorient – France.

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https://douwedeboer.pixieset.com/

Interview of EdOverFlow : Bug Hunter & mastermind of security.txt

Photo Courtesy of Douwe De Boer

What is your background ?

I am a web developer, security researcher, and a computer science student at the ETH Zürich. In my spare time, I like to contribute to open-source projects, hunt for security vulnerabilities, and triage reports. For a long time, one of my biggest goals has been to learn something new as often as possible and get to know people who share a similar passion for what they do.

How long have you been bug hunting and what are you driven by ?

I have been bug bounty hunting for roughly one and a half years, but I have been interested in security for quite a while. Curiosity and learning something new are what drive me the most. I find myself constantly wanting to try something new and learn as much about the topic as possible.

Can you explain the genesis of security.txt ?

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Datavisualization : CrowdSecurity in Europe by YesWeHack

2017 was an important year for YesWeHack, especially for our Bug Bounty service !

Below you will find a data-visualization from our BountyFactory.io platform over the past year.

As the first Bug Bounty platform in Europe, this is the first time key figures have been published.

We are proud to announce that 67% of the YesWeHack bug hunters’ community is made up of Europeans.

In 2017, thanks to our community of experts, more than 2000 bugs were reported, of which 40% were considered critical with a CVSS score of 7 or more.

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The Dark Side of XSS revealed

Cross-site scripting (XSS) is one of the most common web application vulnerabilities and is still present in the OWASP Top 10-2017.

The goal of this paper is not to explain how to bypass antiXSS filter in browser or WAF protection, but to figure out what possibilities are offered by XSS vulnerabilities.

CISOs like Bug Bounty Managers need to pay attention to this kind of vulnerability which -at times- can be critical through the first steps of chaining.

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Datavisualisation : la Crowdsecurity en Europe par YesWeHack

2017 a été une année importante pour YesWeHack, notamment en ce qui concerne le Bug Bounty.

Vous trouverez ci-dessous une infographie qui reprend des données clés tirées de notre plateforme BountyFactory.io durant l’année passée.

En tant que 1re plateforme de Bug Bounty en Europe, c’est la première fois que des chiffres sont publiés.

Nous sommes fiers de vous annoncer que la communauté d’experts YesWeHack se compose à 67% d’Européens.

En 2017, grâce à notre communauté d’experts,  plus de 2000 bugs ont été remontés dont 40% étaient considérés comme critiques avec un score CVSS supérieur ou égal à 7.

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Pépinière d'entreprises _ Atalante Beaulieu

YesWeHack ouvre des bureaux à Rennes et contribue à l’écosystème cybersec en Bretagne

Depuis 2013, YesWeHack n’a cessé de croître et se renforce aujourd’hui avec de nouveaux locaux, au sein de la pépinière numérique à Cesson-Sévigné, en Bretagne, deuxième région « cybersec » après l’Ile-de France.

Le marché de la cybersécurité, particulièrement attractif, attire aussi bien une clientèle nationale qu’internationale. Afin de répondre aux attentes de cette clientèle exigeante, notre équipe s’agrandit et prend ses quartiers à la pépinière numérique à Cesson-Sévigné.

L’équipe YesWeHack bénéficie désormais de locaux dédiés où Romain LECOEUVRE (CTO), Laurent JOUANNIC (Business Development) et Nicolas DIAZ (Communication) auront un accès plus aisé pour coopérer et échanger avec les décideurs et les porteurs de projets bretons.

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Open Source, NGOs & Hackers : Unity is strength

YesWeHack is definitely a group of passionate people who all have become professionals. As passionate people, we do have principles and it is precisely these principles that keep us on the right path of our social, economic and financial development.

For some of you, you’ve been noticing that we are operating in a competitive world without forgetting our fundamentals.
We are willing to defend the common goods mainly the Internet neutrality, Press Freedom, Open Source (software & hardware).

To us, those 3 pillars – amongst others – are strong allies for Civil Society and especially for NGOs to defend and promote Human Rights.

This is the reason why we do care about helping NGOs and non-profit organizations who share the same principles.

Cooperation is good for all of us !

In 2017, our community of security researchers participated in 3 bug bounty programs powered by our Bounty Factory :

In june 2017, the first program was launched by OCCRP and it exposed one tool of the organization : VIS.OCCRP.org

As a matter of fact, OCCRP is involved in the original Panama Papers, Paradise Papers amongst many other projects.

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Incentive Policy for Coordinated Vulnerability Disclosure

Assessment

For the past ten years or so, organizations have been trying to implement operational policies to avoid “Full Disclosure” reports or “Open Bug Bounty” whose methods are not that good in terms of honesty and responsibility.

Speaking of responsibility, you may be familiar with the notion of “Responsible Disclosure” and you wonder how it differs from the concept of Coordinated Vulnerability Disclosure?

The concept of responsible disclosure has too often been at the root of endless discussions:

On the one hand the vendors denounce “Disclosing a vulnerability without providing patches is not responsible”.
and the other, “Don’t fix this vulnerability as quickly as possible is not responsible”, say security researchers.

During this precious time when both sides argue, the system concerned is at the opponent’s mercy.

In order to move towards greater efficiency and to get out of sterile debates, it is therefore important to avoid speaking of “responsible disclosure”. This is why many organizations advocate the concept of “Coordinated Vulnerability Disclosure” (CVD) in order to promote and strengthen cooperation between the various actors in cybersecurity, all of whom have a common goal: Make the Internet safer.

Coordinated Vulnerability Disclosure

Coordinated Vulnerability Disclosure

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