Category: GDPR

YesWeHack soutient l’appel de Paris pour renforcer la coopération entre les acteurs du numérique.

YesWeHack soutient l’Appel de Paris pour la confiance et la sécurité dans le cyber-espace.

Fort de ses membres fondateurs issus de la communauté de Hackers français et européens, YesWeHack promeut les actions de partage et de transmission de la connaissance, ainsi que de renforcement de la souveraineté numérique pour la création et le maintien des environnements de confiance.

Guidé par ses principes fondateurs, YesWeHack continue à fédérer, à coopérer avec l’ensemble des acteurs du numérique et à s’engager pour mieux sécuriser le cyber-espace.

Aujourd’hui, YesWeHack met à disposition sa plateforme de CrowdSecurity à tous les acteurs ayant à cœur de suivre la ligne directrice de l’appel de Paris. Cette plateforme rassemble une communauté, la plus importante d’Europe, de plus de 5000 hackers éthiques.

Dans un contexte géopolitique complexe, face à des cyber-menaces croissantes et aux risques économiques et politiques, YesWeHack s’engage au quotidien pour défendre une idée de la confiance et de la sécurité du cyber-espace.

Notre engagement est du côté d’un développement du numérique soucieux de la défense de nos démocraties, de nos patrimoines informationnels, et donc de la protection des données de tous les citoyens l’Union Européenne et d’ailleurs.

Nos démocraties sont un enjeu fort en matière de cybersécurité et il est important de proposer des solutions adaptées pour mieux sécuriser les outils utilisés par les citoyens et ce, au quotidien et pendant les périodes électorales.

Guillaume Vassault-Houlière, CEO de YesWeHack

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L’Appel de Paris

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YesWeHack rejoint le Pôle d’Excellence Cyber !

C’est avec une fierté non dissimulée que YesWeHack annonce son intégration au Pôle d’Excellence Cyber.

Nous avons été cooptés et nous allons honorer cette confiance au sein du PEC pour contribuer au rayonnnement de savoir-faire français et Européen en termes de CyberSécurité.

YesWeHack va notamment apporter son expertise sur deux disciplines à savoir : le recrutement des talents spécialisés en cybersécurité et la divulgation coordonnée de vulnérabilités.

Déjà presents au coeur de l’écosystème breton avec une base à Rennes, YesWeHack continue de tisser des liens et de coopérer avec tous les acteurs de la région.

Bug Bounty: Take the leap – [ITW] Alain Tiemblo @BlaBlaCar

Alain Tiemblo – BlaBlaCar Web Security Lead Engineer

Since September 2017, BlaBlaCar has been managing with a select number of security experts a private Bug Bounty program to enhance the operational security of its platform.

Previously accessible only by invitation via BountyFactory.io, YesWeHack’s bug bounty platform, this program has enabled BlaBlaCar to remain proactive on the cyber security of its services.

Thursday April 19, BlaBlaCar’s program is public

What is your role at BlaBlaCar?

I am a backend developer profile, today overseeing application security. When I joined BlaBlaCar, I was in charge of the platform’s performance and security. In mid-2015 and early 2016, our operational security needed to level up significantly, especially following our major fund-raising campaigns, which put BlaBlaCar under the light and pressure. So at that period of time, i took the lead of a small team to mitigate these attacks, and audit/consolidate the platform.

What is your approach to security, including coordinated vulnerability disclosure?

We have kept application security in-house for a long time. Previously, we used classical audits conducted by various companies, by several basic pentest applications, by using static analysis tools, etc. I think it helped to rough out a lot of little things that would have been detected by bug hunters.

In addition, we received a few troll messages on Twitter reporting vulnerabilities without notice and without any details… We also have some emails via customer support about potential security holes, but nothing was disclosed by these contacts, they first wanted to be paid and this, without proof of the existence of a security flaw, so it was impossible for us to enter the game.

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Incentive Policy for Coordinated Vulnerability Disclosure

Assessment

For the past ten years or so, organizations have been trying to implement operational policies to avoid “Full Disclosure” reports or “Open Bug Bounty” whose methods are not that good in terms of honesty and responsibility.

Speaking of responsibility, you may be familiar with the notion of “Responsible Disclosure” and you wonder how it differs from the concept of Coordinated Vulnerability Disclosure?

The concept of responsible disclosure has too often been at the root of endless discussions:

On the one hand the vendors denounce “Disclosing a vulnerability without providing patches is not responsible”.
and the other, “Don’t fix this vulnerability as quickly as possible is not responsible”, say security researchers.

During this precious time when both sides argue, the system concerned is at the opponent’s mercy.

In order to move towards greater efficiency and to get out of sterile debates, it is therefore important to avoid speaking of “responsible disclosure”. This is why many organizations advocate the concept of “Coordinated Vulnerability Disclosure” (CVD) in order to promote and strengthen cooperation between the various actors in cybersecurity, all of whom have a common goal: Make the Internet safer.

Coordinated Vulnerability Disclosure

Coordinated Vulnerability Disclosure

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European Regulation for the Protection of Personal Data and Data Security


By

Eric A. Caprioli, Attorney Admitted to Practice Before Court of Appeals, Juris Doctor, Member of French Delegation to United Nations
&
Isabelle Cantero, Associate (Caprioli & Associés), Lead for Privacy and Personal Data Practice


The European Regulation for the Protection of Personal Data (GDPR) was adopted on April 27, 2016 after 4 years of involved negotiations. Being a directly applicable regulation in each of the Member States (that is, not requiring a national law to implement), it should enable the harmonization of the statutes having to do with the protection of personal data within the European Union and bring the principles of protection into line with the realities of the digital era. It will go into effect on May 25, 2018. For many companies, these new provisions will involve costs related to the investment required to bring their current tools or procedures into compliance with the new rules.

Single Flexible Protective Statute for All EU Member States

The regulation is applicable to every entity in the private and the public sectors. It applies to the issues of Big Data, profiling, Cloud Computing, security of transborder data traffic, data portability when changing service providers… These issues are to be placed alongside the new advance protection principles (privacy by design or by default), analysis-based protection (impact assessment), documented protection (mandatory documentation serving as evidence of statutory compliance), cascading protection (processor liability and the possibility of joint liability), and stronger protection (rights of individuals and consent). And finally, the accountability principle (i. e. the obligation to prove statutory compliance of how personal information is being handled).

As far as stronger protection for the rights of individuals in concerned, consent should be the focus since it should never be implicit or general and it must be provable (documented and traceable) by the controller. Further, in addition to the conventional rights of individuals, such as access, correction/deletion and objection, the GDPR creates new rights (limitation on data processing, portability, etc.).

As for sanctions handed down by the enforcement authority  (CNIL), it should already be noted that they could be as high as EUR 3 million pursuant to the Digital Republic legislation of October 2016 but with GDPR, for violations of obligations set forth in matters of individual rights they could go all the way to 4% of global revenues, or EUR 20 million. For violations of other obligations prescribed by GDPR, the fines could be as high as 2% of global revenue, or EUR 10 million.

And to round off this brief summary of the changes, the current Ombudsperson for IT and Freedoms (optional designation) will be replaced by a Data Protection Officer whose functions will clearly be broader. This designation is mandatory under certain conditions: in a Government body or authority, whenever data processing enables regular and systematic large-scale monitoring of individuals, whenever sensitive or criminal record information is being processed on a large scale, or whenever required by Union or Member State law.

Personal Data Protection Core Security

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