Category: Security by design (Page 2 of 3)

OVH Bug Bounty RetEx by Vincent Malguy

As OVH bug bounty manager from March 2016 to March 2018, Vincent Malguy, through this interview, delivers his return of experience to share some tips with people who wonder how to set up and manage a program.

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The genesis

In the early 2010’s, many companies in the IT sector like Facebook or Google started to launch bug bounty programs and within OVH this appeared as an obvious need. However, it took time to frame the project and to meet all the operational conditions to take the leap.

In 2015, when I was recruited by OVH, it was time to put in place all the bricks to calmly launch a bug bounty.

Back in the day, we identified two issues: the issue of vulnerability export and the legal complexity when paying rewards.

Of course, we evaluated the possibility of launching it without external help but we quickly gave up the idea because it is not our core business.

In any case since the beginning, it has been clear in our minds that a real bug bounty program is, in the long run, a program open to a wide audience.

In January 2016, we met with Korben and Freeman. They presented YesWeWack’s roadmap to launch the first European bug bounty platform.

The timing was perfect and we decided together to launch OVH’s public program on the occasion of “la Nuit du Hack” in June 2016.

Private phase

In this exercise we have the support of the management and technical teams.

Based on that internal mobilization, we started to carry out an additional audit on the initial scope in order to ensure its maturity. We then worked with the communications, legal and accounting teams. Once these prerequisites were gathered and validated, with YesWeHack, we started with a 1 month private window.

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Bug Bounty: Take the leap – [ITW] Alain Tiemblo @BlaBlaCar

Alain Tiemblo – BlaBlaCar Web Security Lead Engineer

Since September 2017, BlaBlaCar has been managing with a select number of security experts a private Bug Bounty program to enhance the operational security of its platform.

Previously accessible only by invitation via BountyFactory.io, YesWeHack’s bug bounty platform, this program has enabled BlaBlaCar to remain proactive on the cyber security of its services.

Thursday April 19, BlaBlaCar’s program is public

What is your role at BlaBlaCar?

I am a backend developer profile, today overseeing application security. When I joined BlaBlaCar, I was in charge of the platform’s performance and security. In mid-2015 and early 2016, our operational security needed to level up significantly, especially following our major fund-raising campaigns, which put BlaBlaCar under the light and pressure. So at that period of time, i took the lead of a small team to mitigate these attacks, and audit/consolidate the platform.

What is your approach to security, including coordinated vulnerability disclosure?

We have kept application security in-house for a long time. Previously, we used classical audits conducted by various companies, by several basic pentest applications, by using static analysis tools, etc. I think it helped to rough out a lot of little things that would have been detected by bug hunters.

In addition, we received a few troll messages on Twitter reporting vulnerabilities without notice and without any details… We also have some emails via customer support about potential security holes, but nothing was disclosed by these contacts, they first wanted to be paid and this, without proof of the existence of a security flaw, so it was impossible for us to enter the game.

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Bug Bounty : Franchir le pas – ITW d’Alain Tiemblo @ BlaBlaCar

Alain Tiemblo - Bug Bounty - Vulnerability Coordination

Depuis septembre 2017, BlaBlaCar propose à un nombre d’experts en sécurité triés sur le volet, un
programme de Bug Bounty privé afin de renforcer la sécurité opérationnelle de sa plateforme. Accessible
jusqu’alors uniquement sur invitation via BountyFactory.io, la plateforme de bug bounty de YesWeHack, ce programme a permis à BlaBlaCar de rester proactif sur la cybersécurité de ses services.

Entretien avec Alain Tiemblo Web Security Lead Engineer – @BlaBlaCar – manager du programme de Bug Bounty.

Jeudi 19 avril le programme de BlaBlaCar est public

Quel est votre rôle au sein de BlaBlaCar ?

Je suis un profil développeur backend, aujourd’hui chapeautant la sécurité applicative. Lorsque je suis arrivé à BlaBlaCar, je m’occupais de la performance et la sécurité de la plateforme. Mi 2015 début 2016, nos besoins en sécurité opérationnelle ont augmenté de manière significative notamment à la suite de nos grosses levées de fonds qui ont suscité quelques convoitises. J’ai alors pris le lead d’une petite équipe afin de mitiger ces attaques, et auditer / consolider la plateforme.

Quelle est votre démarche en termes de sécurité et notamment de divulgation coordonnée de vulnérabilités?

Nous avons pendant longtemps gardé la sécurité applicative en interne. Auparavant, nous faisions appel à des audits classiques menés par diverses entreprises, par plusieurs applications de pentest, en utilisant des outils d’analyses statiques, etc. Je pense que ça a permis de dégrossir beaucoup de petites choses qui auraient été détectées par des chasseurs de failles.

Par ailleurs, on a reçu quelques messages de trolls sur Twitter signalant des failles sans préavis et sans aucun détails…

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https://douwedeboer.pixieset.com/

Interview of EdOverFlow : Bug Hunter & mastermind of security.txt

Photo Courtesy of Douwe De Boer

What is your background ?

I am a web developer, security researcher, and a computer science student at the ETH Zürich. In my spare time, I like to contribute to open-source projects, hunt for security vulnerabilities, and triage reports. For a long time, one of my biggest goals has been to learn something new as often as possible and get to know people who share a similar passion for what they do.

How long have you been bug hunting and what are you driven by ?

I have been bug bounty hunting for roughly one and a half years, but I have been interested in security for quite a while. Curiosity and learning something new are what drive me the most. I find myself constantly wanting to try something new and learn as much about the topic as possible.

Can you explain the genesis of security.txt ?

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Le Réseau Thématique French Tech #Security #Privacy

Guillaume Vassault Houlière, CEO de YesWeHack, est un des ambassadeurs du Réseau Thématique French Tech #Security #Privacy .

Ce réseau a pour objectifs : d’organiser un Tour de France sur la thématique “security & privacy” afin de fédérer l’écosystème, de développer et valoriser à l’international le savoir-faire des acteurs français en matière de cybersécurité.

Ce tour permettra notamment de continuer la sensibilisation des utilisateurs en entreprise (PME, ETI et Grands Groupes) à la sécurité et à la protection des données personnelles. C’est là une des clefs de la réussite de la transformation numérique.

Une des missions principale du réseau est l’identification des startups axées sur la cyber-Securité et la protection des données personnelles. L’idée c’est de procéder à un inventaire des besoins et de motiver des entrepreneurs « emblématiques » pour qu’ils deviennent des business angels et/ou des mentors.

Enfin, le réseau et tous ses acteurs ont pour activité la promotion du fonds French Tech Accélération aux entrepreneurs pouvant réinvestir dans l’écosystème.

En savoir plus sur la feuille de route

Incentive Policy for Coordinated Vulnerability Disclosure

Assessment

For the past ten years or so, organizations have been trying to implement operational policies to avoid “Full Disclosure” reports or “Open Bug Bounty” whose methods are not that good in terms of honesty and responsibility.

Speaking of responsibility, you may be familiar with the notion of “Responsible Disclosure” and you wonder how it differs from the concept of Coordinated Vulnerability Disclosure?

The concept of responsible disclosure has too often been at the root of endless discussions:

On the one hand the vendors denounce “Disclosing a vulnerability without providing patches is not responsible”.
and the other, “Don’t fix this vulnerability as quickly as possible is not responsible”, say security researchers.

During this precious time when both sides argue, the system concerned is at the opponent’s mercy.

In order to move towards greater efficiency and to get out of sterile debates, it is therefore important to avoid speaking of “responsible disclosure”. This is why many organizations advocate the concept of “Coordinated Vulnerability Disclosure” (CVD) in order to promote and strengthen cooperation between the various actors in cybersecurity, all of whom have a common goal: Make the Internet safer.

Coordinated Vulnerability Disclosure

Coordinated Vulnerability Disclosure

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Cybersecurity & Bug Bounty: Attack is the best form of defence

uillaume Vassault-Houlière President of Yes We HackBy Guillaume Vassault-Houlière | CEO of YesWeHack

Through our European platform BountyFactory.io, Bug Bounty is gaining respectability in France and Europe.

Bug Bounty is an innovative and operational practice from the United States that rewards security experts who find security flaws in IT systems.

Within a complex geopolitical context, Europe and France can compete in defending a European model of digital sovereignty.

In the light of new threats and given reports of organizations that are victims of piracy and irreversible damage, some innovative cyber security policies and approaches need to be adopted.

Cybersecurity is a powerful ally for leading digital transformation.

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Confronting reality is the duty of every IT security professional

Interview of Stéphane Bourou | Technical Project Manager at Ercom

For 30 years, Ercom has developed a leadership position in the communications, data and terminal security markets.
This position is based on complementary technological expertise in Telco/cloud infrastructure, cryptography and software and on shared values: innovation, expertise, commitment and confidentiality.

Our products and expertise are recognized in France and internationally by major companies, customers, partners and certification entities.

All our solutions are certified or in the process of certification by ANSSI.

Two examples that illustrate Ercom’s expertise:

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Qwant.com & BountyFactory.io to harden companies’ systems

Qwant.com‘s Security & Privacy Fund is now real and it aims at hardening companies’ systems through our BountyFactory.io !

Qwant has always believed that the development of online services should be done with maximum protection of the confidentiality of users personal data. That is why Qwant took a “privacy by design” and a “data minimization” approach from day one, which requires to think preventively of the technical means and business models that generate as little risks as possible for the privacy of users.

Since 2014, thanks to YesWeHack founders, Qwant has created its bug bounty program.

Each year Qwant offers bounties to the vulnerabilities hunters gathered at La Nuit du Hack, in Paris. Those programs run by HackerzVoice & YesWeHack teams have significantly helped Qwant to build up skills, and to even better protect their users personal data.

And for the 15th edition of La Nuit du Hack, Qwant wants to offer other startups and organizations – thanks to its fund – the opportunity to challenge and increase the security of their services with the best hackers in Europe and in the world, to improve privacy on the Internet.

Qwant grants 10,000 euros to this fund, that will allow to pay bounties to hackers who will discover vulnerabilities on the services of startups or associations that share Qwant’s ethical values.

Organizations that are selected to benefit from this fund will of course be accompanied to put the bug bounty program together.

You can find all the necessary details to apply for this Privacy & Security Fund at the operation’s official website: https://hackmeimfamous.com/

European Regulation for the Protection of Personal Data and Data Security


By

Eric A. Caprioli, Attorney Admitted to Practice Before Court of Appeals, Juris Doctor, Member of French Delegation to United Nations
&
Isabelle Cantero, Associate (Caprioli & Associés), Lead for Privacy and Personal Data Practice


The European Regulation for the Protection of Personal Data (GDPR) was adopted on April 27, 2016 after 4 years of involved negotiations. Being a directly applicable regulation in each of the Member States (that is, not requiring a national law to implement), it should enable the harmonization of the statutes having to do with the protection of personal data within the European Union and bring the principles of protection into line with the realities of the digital era. It will go into effect on May 25, 2018. For many companies, these new provisions will involve costs related to the investment required to bring their current tools or procedures into compliance with the new rules.

Single Flexible Protective Statute for All EU Member States

The regulation is applicable to every entity in the private and the public sectors. It applies to the issues of Big Data, profiling, Cloud Computing, security of transborder data traffic, data portability when changing service providers… These issues are to be placed alongside the new advance protection principles (privacy by design or by default), analysis-based protection (impact assessment), documented protection (mandatory documentation serving as evidence of statutory compliance), cascading protection (processor liability and the possibility of joint liability), and stronger protection (rights of individuals and consent). And finally, the accountability principle (i. e. the obligation to prove statutory compliance of how personal information is being handled).

As far as stronger protection for the rights of individuals in concerned, consent should be the focus since it should never be implicit or general and it must be provable (documented and traceable) by the controller. Further, in addition to the conventional rights of individuals, such as access, correction/deletion and objection, the GDPR creates new rights (limitation on data processing, portability, etc.).

As for sanctions handed down by the enforcement authority  (CNIL), it should already be noted that they could be as high as EUR 3 million pursuant to the Digital Republic legislation of October 2016 but with GDPR, for violations of obligations set forth in matters of individual rights they could go all the way to 4% of global revenues, or EUR 20 million. For violations of other obligations prescribed by GDPR, the fines could be as high as 2% of global revenue, or EUR 10 million.

And to round off this brief summary of the changes, the current Ombudsperson for IT and Freedoms (optional designation) will be replaced by a Data Protection Officer whose functions will clearly be broader. This designation is mandatory under certain conditions: in a Government body or authority, whenever data processing enables regular and systematic large-scale monitoring of individuals, whenever sensitive or criminal record information is being processed on a large scale, or whenever required by Union or Member State law.

Personal Data Protection Core Security

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